Uilleann piping (Ireland)

Tradition

UILLEANN PIPING. Inscribed in 2017 on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Uilleann piping is a musical practice which uses a particular type of bagpipe (known as the ‘uilleann’, ‘Irish’ or ‘union’ pipes) to play Irish music. It is a highly developed instrument with strong roots in tradition dating back many generations. Bearers and practitioners are dispersed throughout the world, but the greatest concentration is in Ireland and Irish communities abroad. Uilleann piping offers an important way of socializing and plays an integral role in life events such as marriages and funerals, where it provides a sense of rootedness and a connection to the past. The most highly valued method of transmission is the practice of one-to-one, master-to-student instruction, but transmission also occurs through more modern methods such as video and DVD tutorials and the internet.

TRADITION WILL REPRESENT:

Chris McMullan (Strabane, Ireland)

Chris McMullan is an exceptionally gifted uilleann piper and whistle player from Strabane in County Tyrone. He began piping at eight years old, taught by local uilleann piper and whistler Noel Devine, and joined the famous Armagh Pipers Club at twelve. Chris has been influenced by great pipers like Seamus Ennis and Patsy Touhy, but has gone on to develop his own unique style that has been recognized by multiple awards at the All Ireland music competitions. Chris has performed extensively throughout Ireland and Europe. Chris is invited to give piping workshops around in Europe, North America and Australia. His first solo album “Uilleann Tales” has received wide acclaim.

 

: 2019 07 11 | : 19.00 val